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Author Topic: Power Questions + other questions  (Read 6555 times)
Liquidretro
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« on: March 07, 2010, 11:36:35 AM »

So I got my ArduiNIX built and put on top of an ArduinoMega.  The system is powered with a 12V DC wall wart.  So far I have just wired up one tube to test that it works and it does.  See video and photos below. My question is I want to make this clock sync with the atomic clock.  I have a couple of options to do this and everything needs power to do so.  My question is, What pins would be the best to pull power from and will there be enough?  I need around 3V. 

My second question is I would like to build in a switch so that I can turn off the tubes to save on their life.  Has anyone done this in the past? 

Also what has everyone used for a case?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mPO805MPZ1Q



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k9zw
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« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2010, 05:36:05 PM »

So I got my ArduiNIX built and put on top of an ArduinoMega.  The system is powered with a 12V DC wall wart.  So far I have just wired up one tube to test that it works and it does.  See video and photos below. My question is I want to make this clock sync with the atomic clock.  I have a couple of options to do this and everything needs power to do so.  My question is, What pins would be the best to pull power from and will there be enough?  I need around 3V. 

My second question is I would like to build in a switch so that I can turn off the tubes to save on their life.  Has anyone done this in the past? 

Also what has everyone used for a case?


I am looking at adding a Chronodot TCXO module to my ArduiNIX clocks.  Eliminates the need for any external reference (we've had grief keeping commercial units synced with WWV ("The Atomic Clock") and the Chronodot's roughly 6ppm accuracy is enough for my projects.  At $15 they are a lot cheaper than an accurate WWV module as well.  http://macetech.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=5&products_id=8

They draw 840nA max, and can take a wide range of voltage.

With a projected lifespan of many years of use, is it really worth worrying about lifespan.  I will have to spend some time pondering the code & circuitry to see if the display can be shut down independent of the clock portion.  Not driving the tubes could be a lot of hassle, as unless you dump the power into a substitute load you are going to have some potential for interesting high voltage wanting to go somewhere. WIll have to dig into it.

I'm working out an acrylic "show-all" case for mine.  A lot of folk auger blocks of wood or do pop-up from base designs.

regards,

Steve
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catdotgif
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« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2010, 01:37:11 PM »

I am considering adding a passive infrared or ultrasound occupancy sensor to my circuit so that the clock won't stay on when I'm not around-- are you saying that turning off the digits is not as simple as turning off the low voltage control pins?  Should I add a relay into the high voltage supply to switch it off?
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Silvio Costigliolo
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« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2010, 06:30:17 AM »

Hi all !!

I had the same problem than you, but for different reasons. My girlfriend does not like any light while sleeping. I fight so much in defense of router, switches, and other devices emitting light during night.... and I won.
But I´d plan to install a 4 IN-1 nixies in front of my bed.....
As I dont want to choose between my girlfriend and the clock, I start to think any possible trick. The solution found was to drive the high voltage power supply INPUT with some cheap infrared passive detector.
You have to know I dont understand almost nothing about code, so I must do this by hardware.(any help about how to drive this by software will be so helpful !!!! , I made several unsucessful experiments............)

I bought a cheap passive detector from dealextreme, cut off all unnedded white leds. (If you want to know dealextreme item number, just ask).
Then I used device led output to drive a TIP 120 as a switch. I´d cut the 9V supply track in Arduinix pcb,  so in this way I dont feed the HV power supply. No problems about what to do with the HV, or any dummy load to apply. The passive detector needs a 3v power supply (originally 2 AA batteries), so I used the 3,3v pin in Arduinix, with an 1n4004 in series. I´d attach 2 photos of the project. It works fine, you only need to wave one hand, or just turn in bed to activate digits. Then automatically turns off in about 40 seconds.

Hope this idea can help you.

About atomic clock, I think the same than k9zw. I ask some DS3231 samples to Maxim, but dont know how to read it´s output signal, so I´m researching for any solution.

Cheers !
« Last Edit: June 16, 2010, 09:03:16 AM by Silvio Costigliolo » Logged

neonglass
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« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2010, 08:04:50 PM »

The DS3231 chip uses the I2C software and hardware interface.  An easy way to do this in software is to use the Arduino "Wire" library and hook the chip up to the analog pins 4 and 5 of the Arduino.  Check out the sample code for the Macetech Chronodot which uses the chip: http://docs.macetech.com/doku.php/chronodot

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Silvio Costigliolo
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« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2010, 06:27:30 AM »

Thanks a lot Neonglass, I
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